The Triple Intervention: A Forgotten Memory in the Discourse of the Nineteenth Century's International Law

Author:Bijun Xu
Position:Post-doctoral Researcher at Tsinghua University, China. LL.B. (Tsinghua), LL.M. (UMich), Ph.D. (HKU)
Pages:375-376
SUMMARY

The 19th century’s international law distinguished civilized from non-civilized States resulting in any country desiring equal treatment was required to obtain recognition from those already deemed civilized. Japan was able to join the civilized world by presenting a civilized image of itself in the First Sino-Japanese War, which was depicted by Western legal scholars as a clash between barbarism ... (see full summary)

 
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The Triple Intervention 375
XI JEAIL 2 (2018)
Bijun Xu
The 19th century’s international law distinguished civilized from non-civilized States
resulting in any country desiring equal treatment was required to obtain recognition
from those already deemed civilized. Japan was able to join the civilized world by
presenting a civilized image of itself in the First Sino-Japanese War, which was depicted
by Western legal scholars as a clash between barbarism and civilization. Neither
Japanese nor Western scholars of international law, however, have touched on the issue
of the Triple Intervention. This incident serves as a case study for re-evaluating the
operation of Western countries’ international legal standards. The argument is, that
these countries cloak their motives in legal language for self-aggrandizement, thereby
demonstrating the ahistorical nature of the Wests rhetoric of civilization. Further, this
incident taught Japan the lesson that international law is concerned not with morality
but with power.
Keywords
The Triple Intervention, 19th century
s International Law, Discourse of
Civilization, Japan, First Sino-Japanese War
The Triple Intervention:
A Forgotten Memory
in the Discourse of the
Nineteenth Century
s
International Law
Post-doctoral Researcher at Tsinghua University, China. LL.B. (Tsinghua), LL.M. (UMich), Ph.D. (HKU). ORCID:
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0104-8749. This article is revised and updated version of Chapter VII of the author’s doctoral
dissertation submitted to the graduate committee of the University of Hong Kong. This work was supported by China
Postdoctoral Science Foundation. The author may be contacted at: xubijun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn /Address: School of
Public Policy and Management, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 P.R. China.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14330/jeail.2018.11.2.06

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