Reasonable Suspicion: Gloomy Future of the Kyoto Protocol

Author:Kelly Gieop Na
Pages:553-574
SUMMARY

About 25 years ago, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change claimed that the greenhouse gases, in particular Carbon Dioxide, are mainly responsible for global warming and its adverse effects. The claim rapidly became an absolute and incontrovertible truth regardless of countless scientific counter-evidences. Such international trend was directed to a birth of the United Nations Framework... (see full summary)

 
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Gloomy Future of the Kyoto Protocol
553
VI JEAIL 2 (2013)
Kelly Gieop Na
About 25 years ago, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change claimed
that the greenhouse gases, in particular Carbon Dioxide, are mainly responsible
for global warming and its adverse effects. The claim rapidly became an
absolute and incontrovertible truth regardless of countless scientific counter-
evidences. Such international trend was directed to a birth of the United Nations
Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol, the detailed
norm to the Convention. Even to this very day, the
man-made climate change
operates as implicit prerequisite of continuing international climate conferences
and international environmental law studies. The paper tries to introduce a
    

demonstrates that serious concern about the environment barely exists in current
climate response system and attempts to adduce suggestions that should be made
in future climate change conferences.
Keywords
Climate Change, Fossil Fuel, UNFCCC, Kyoto Protocol, Intergovernmental
Panel on Climate Change, Global Warming, ETS, Common but Differentiated
Responsibilities
Reasonable Suspicion:
Gloomy Future of the
Kyoto Protocol
J.D. candidate. LL.B. (Dongguk Univ. Korea) The author may be contacted at: boulez25@naver.com / Address: 487-
2, Namjeon-ri, Maseo-myeon, Seocheon-gun, Chungcheongnam-do 325-812 Korea.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14330/jeail.2013.6.2.10
STUDENT CONTRIBUTION
554 Kelly Na
I. Introduction
On November 26, 2012, the eighteenth annual conference of the Parties to the United
Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) was held in Doha,
Qatar. There, an agreement was reached to extend the life of the Kyoto Protocol
(KP) up to 2020, which had been originally due to expire by the end of 2012.
Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction obligation was also reallocated. Some applaud
the output of this Conference, expressing relief because of the extension of KP.
1
Yet,
others still stand skeptical, pointing out that the absence of world’s leading countries
including the United States (US) and China in the KP may not be an effective
solution to the climate change.
2
As a result of the Doha Conference, a few questions of international law have
been newly arising, e.g., an alternative energy technology aid for developing
countries, allocation of reduction obligation based on the principle of equity, matter
of common but differentiated responsibilities, and enactment of legislation to
compensate the defect of international emission trading system. Now these pressing
concerns of international society are destined to remain in existence by the extension
of KP.
The primary purpose of this research is to introduce a viewpoint from the
scientific skepticism towards man-made climate change and to figure out the
political calculations inside KP from a viewpoint of international law. This paper is
      
the progress of international discourse of climate change from the beginning to the
launch of the UNFCCC system. Part three will chase factors that had decisive effects
     

progress.
1 Staff Writer, What Doha Did: No progress today, but a slightly better chance of progress tomorrow, The economisT,
Dec. 15, 2012, available at http://www.economist.com/news/international/21568355-no-progress-today-slightly-better-
chance-progress-tomorrow-what-doha-did; Doha Climate Conference Opens Gateway to Greater Ambition and Action on
Climate Change, United Nations Environment Programme, Dec. 9, 2012, available at http://www.unep.org/newscentre/
default.aspx?DocumentID=2700&ArticleID=9353 (all last visited on Sept. 18, 2013).
2 L. Gray, Doha: Climate Change Deal Limping towards ‘Disappointing’ Conclusion, The Telegraph, Dec. 7, 2012,
available at http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/environment/climatechange/9730981/Doha-Climate-change-deal-limping-
towards-disappointing-conclusion.html (last visited on Sept. 18, 2013).

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