R169 - Employment Policy (Supplementary Provisions) Recommendation, 1984 (No. 169)

 
EXTRACTO GRATUITO
Preamble

The General Conference of the International Labour Organisation,

Having been convened at Geneva by the Governing Body of the International Labour Office, and having met in its Seventieth Session on 6 June 1984, and

Noting the existing international standards contained in the Employment Policy Convention and Recommendation, 1964, as well as in other international labour instruments relating to certain categories of workers, in particular the Workers with Family Responsibilities Convention and Recommendation, 1981, the Older Workers Recommendation, 1980, the Migration for Employment Convention and Recommendation (Revised), 1949, the Migrant Workers (Supplementary Provisions) Convention, 1975, and the Migrant Workers Recommendation, 1975,

Recalling the responsibility of the International Labour Organisation, resulting from the Declaration of Philadelphia, to examine and consider the bearing of economic and financial policies upon employment policy in the light of the fundamental objective that all human beings, irrespective of race, creed or sex, have the right to pursue both their material well-being and their spiritual development in conditions of freedom and dignity, of economic security and equal opportunity,

Recalling that the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1966, provides for the recognition of inter alia the right to work, which includes the right of everyone to the opportunity to gain his living by work which he freely chooses or accepts, and for the taking of appropriate steps to achieve progressively the full realisation of, and to safeguard, this right,

Recalling also the provisions of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1979,

Recognising, in the light of increasing interdependence within the world economy and of low economic growth rates in recent years, the need to coordinate economic, monetary and social policies at the national and international levels, to strive for the reduction of disparities between developed and developing countries and for the establishment of the new international economic order, in order to make the fullest possible use of resources for development and for the creation of employment opportunities, and thus to combat unemployment and underemployment,

Noting the deterioration of employment opportunities in most industrialised and developing countries and expressing the conviction that poverty, unemployment and inequality of opportunity are unacceptable in terms of humanity and social justice, can provoke social tension and thus create conditions which can endanger peace and prejudice the exercise of the right to work, which includes free choice of employment, just and favourable conditions of work and protection against unemployment,

Considering that the Employment Policy Convention and Recommendation, 1964, should be placed in the wider framework of the Declaration of Principles and Programme of Action adopted in 1976 by the Tripartite World Conference on Employment, Income Distribution and Social Progress and the International Division of Labour, and of the resolution concerning follow-up to the World Employment Conference adopted by the International Labour Conference in 1979,

Having decided upon the adoption of certain proposals with regard to employment policy which is the fourth item on the agenda of the session, and

Having determined that these proposals shall take the form of a Recommendation supplementing the Employment Policy Convention and Recommendation, 1964:

adopts this twenty-sixth day of June of the year one thousand nine hundred and eighty-four, the following Recommendation, which may be cited as the Employment Policy (Supplementary Provisions) Recommendation, 1984.

I. General Principles of Employment Policy
  1. 1. The promotion of full, productive and freely chosen employment provided for in the Employment Policy Convention and Recommendation, 1964, should be regarded as the means of achieving in practice the realisation of the right to work.
  2. 2. Full recognition by Members of the right to work should be linked with the implementation of economic and social policies, the purpose of which is the promotion of full, productive and freely chosen employment.
  3. 3. The promotion of full, productive and freely chosen employment should be the priority in, and an integral part of, economic and social policies of Members and, where appropriate, their plans for the satisfaction of the basic needs of the population.
  4. 4. Members should give special attention to the most efficient means of increasing employment and production and draw up policies and, if appropriate, programmes designed to facilitate the increased production and fair distribution of essential goods and services and the fair distribution of income throughout the country, with a view to satisfying the basic needs of the population in accordance with the Declaration of Principles and Programme of Action of the World Employment Conference.
  5. 5. In accordance with national practice, the policies, plans and programmes referred to in Paragraphs 3 and 4 of this Recommendation should be drawn up and implemented in consultation and co-operation with the organisations of employers and workers and other organisations representative of the persons concerned, particularly those in the rural sector covered by the Rural Workers' Organisations Convention and Recommendation, 1975.
  6. 6. Economic and financial policies, at both the national and international levels, should reflect the priority to be attached to the goals referred to in Paragraphs 3 and 4 of this Recommendation.
  7. 7. The policies, plans and programmes referred to in Paragraphs 3 and 4 of this Recommendation should aim at eliminating any discrimination and ensuring for all workers equal opportunity and treatment in respect of access to employment, conditions of employment, wages and income, vocational guidance and training and career development.
  8. 8. Members should take measures to combat effectively illegal employment, that is employment which does not comply with the requirements of national laws, regulations and practice.
  9. 9. Members should take measures to enable the progressive transfer of workers from the informal sector, where it exists, to the formal sector to take place.
  10. 10. Members should adopt policies and take measures which, while taking account of national law and practice, should-
    • (a) facilitate adjustment to structural change at the global, sectoral and enterprise levels and the re-employment of workers who have lost their jobs as a result of structural and technological changes; and
    • (b) safeguard the employment or facilitate the re-employment of workers affected in the case of sale, transfer, closure or relocation of a company, establishment or equipment.
  11. 11. In accordance with national law and practice, the methods of giving effect to employment policies might include negotiating collective agreements on questions...

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