Establishing an OSH management system (adapted from the ILO Guidelines on occupational safety and health management systems, ILO/OSH 2001)

Author:International Labour Organization
Pages:92-100
 
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MEISI05-R-2005-02-0159-1-En.doc
Annex IV
Establishing an OSH management system
(adapted from the ILO Guidelines on occupational safety
and health management systems, ILO/OSH 2001)
1. Introduction
1.1. The positive impact of introducing occupational safety and health (OSH) management
systems at the enterprise level, both on the reduction of hazards and risks and on productivity, is
now recognized internationally by governments, employers and workers. The mutual benefits that
accrue from the introduction of such systems should not be ignored if progress on improving safety
and health and productivity in the iron and steel industry is to be achieved.
While systems need to be specific to an iron or steel-making facility and appropriate to the
size and nature of activities, many elements of the ILO-OSH 2001 guidelines are generic and
assistance from other industry sectors should not be difficult to obtain when implementing such a
system. The design and application of OSH management systems at national and facility levels for
iron- and steel-making should be guided by the ILO Guidelines on occupational safety and health
management systems, ILO-OSH 2001.
1.2. The competent authority should:
(a) promote the implementation and integration of OSH management systems as an integral part
of the overall management of iron- and steel-making facilities;
(b) elaborate national guidelines on the voluntary application and systematic implementation of
OSH management systems based on the ILO Guidelines on occupational safety and health
management systems, ILO-OSH 2001, or other internationally recognized safety and health
management systems compatible with ILO-OSH 2001, taking into consideration national
conditions and practice;
(c) encourage the elaboration by authorized institutions of specific (tailored) guidelines on OSH
management systems in iron- and steel-making facilities;
(d) provide support and technical guidance to labour inspectorates, OSH services and other public
or private services, agencies and institutions dealing with OSH, including health-care
providers;
(e) ensure that guidance is provided to employers and workers to assist them to comply with their
legal obligations under the policy;
(f) ensure cooperation between employers whenever two or more facilities engage in activities on
the same project;
(g) recognize the need, so long as the safety and health of workers are not compromised, to
protect confidential information that could potentially cause harm to an employer’s business.
1.3. With a view to developing, implementing and operating OSH management systems,
employers should:
(a) set out in writing their respective OSH policy, programmes and safety and health protection
arrangements as part of the general facility management poli cy;
(b) define the various safety and health responsibilities, accountability and authority levels and
communicate these clearly to their workers, visitors or any other persons working in the
facility, as appropriate;
(c) ensure effective arrangements for the full participation of workers and their representatives in
the fulfilment of the OSH policy;
(d) define both the necessary OSH competence requirements for all persons and the consequent
individual training needs;

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