Adding International Terrorism into the Statute of the ICC. Definition, Benefits to Justice and Obstacles

 
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ADDING THE CRIME OF INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM INTO THE STATUTE OF INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT: DEFINITION, BENEFITS TO JUSTICE AND OBSTACLES

By Dildora Djuraeva

Central European University Department of Legal Studies

Budapest, Hungary

2010

Acknowledgements

CONTENTS

Abstract

Introduction

1. CHAPTER. DEFINING THE CRIME

1.1.The phenomenon of terrorism in the modern world

1.1.1. Roots of the modern notion

1.1.2. Modern legal philosophy about terrorism

1.1.3. Terrorism today: “war” on terrorism

1.2. National criminal legislation and case law on terrorism

1.2.1. The United States

1.2.2. The United Kingdom

1.2.3. Israel

1.2.4. The Russian Federation

1.2.5. Other countries

1.3. Supranational institutions and the UN v. terrorism

1.3.1. Council of Europe: the Framework Convention

1.3.2. European Union

1.3.3. Regional security organizations

1.3.4. The United Nations

1.3.4.1. UN GA & SC Resolutions – de lege ferenda?

1.3.4.1.1. UN General Assembly

1.3.4.1.2. UN Security Council

1.4. International Criminal Law and the Crime of International Terrorism

1.4.1. Draft Code on the Offences against Peace and Security of the Mankind

1.4.2. Rejection to add the crime of terrorism into the ICC statute

1.4.3. Art. 5 crimes and the crime of terrorism

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1.4.4. Kampala Review Conference 2010

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CHAPTER 2. A NEW CRIME TO PROTECT HUMAN RIGHTS?

2.1. Inclusion of a new crime as a guarantee of fair trial

2.2. Unlawful Combatants and International Armed Conflict

2.3. Treatment of “terrorist” defendants in national jurisdictions. Overview

2.4. Stop, search & arrest

2.4.1. The United Kingdom

2.4.2. The United States

2.5. Power to detain (habeas corpus)

2.5.1. The US: Boumediene v. Bush

2.5.2. The UK: A (FC) et al. v. Secretary of State for the Home Department

2.5.3. Israel: A v Minister of Defense

2.6. Torture and inhuman and degrading treatment or punishment

2.6.1. Israel: Landau Report

2.6.2. Public Committee Against Torture in Israel v. State of Israel

2.6.3. The UK: Ireland v the United Kingdom

2.7. Fair trial

2.7.1. Right to be tried “within a reasonable time”/tried “without undue delay”

2.7.2. Right to be tried by “an independent and impartial tribunal”

2.7.3. Presumption of innocence, burden of proof

2.7.4. Right to defend oneself in person (trials in absentia)

2.7.5. Right to have a legal advice, privilege against self-incrimination

2.7.6. Right to examine the witnesses against him and on his behalf

2.7.7. Right to silence

2.8. Death penalty

CHAPTER 3. POSSIBLE...

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